Tag Archives: IP management

New certificate program in IAM for non-IP professionals is being offered by the Illinois Institute of Technology

Lawyers are no longer the only people interested in intellectual property rights.

IP underlies practically everything that developed nations invent, author or manufacture. Professionals who are under increasing pressure to understand, help manage and maximize return of patents, copyrights and trade secrets include people like bankers, engineers, paralegals, marketing professionals, administrators, as well as those responsible for financial oversight.

Now, they can get the valuable skills they need to help businesses compete in an ideas-based economy.

Illinois Institute of Technology has announced that it is offering the Intellectual Asset Management (IAM) online certificate program to help to equip a wide-range of professionals to handle key aspects of the IP value life-cycle, including how to acquire Intellectual Property (IP), maximize value, and engage in patent analytics important for success.

Earned Credits

The IAM program’s three courses, which can be completed in twelve weeks, are derived from the IP Management and Markets (IPMM) master’s degree program offered through IIT in conjunction with Chicago-Kent College of Law. While the IAM certificate is an end in itself, those wishing to go on to the IPMM master’s degree program will receive twelve earned credits towards it. For student perspectives about the IPMM program, go here.

The faculty for the IAM program includes Mickie A. Piatt, Program Director, Associate Professor of Law and Deputy Director of the Program in Intellectual Property Law, at Chicago-Kent College of Law. Professor Piatt is a leading IP educator.

Jackie Leimer, who teaches Acquiring IP, was formerly Associate General Counsel, Global Intellectual Property for Kraft Foods, where she managed all aspects of the company’s trademarks and patents, including clearance, dispute resolution and portfolio management (65,000 registrations and 3000 patent families).

Professor Anthony Trippe is the instructor for “Patent Analytics and Landscape Reports for Decision Making.” This course is the first-of-its-kind in patent analysis, and is part of the IP Management and Markets Masters Degree program at IIT. Professor Trippe is an IAM 300 leading IP strategist.

Speed of Change

“The U.S. and other economies are increasingly innovation-based and content-driven,” said Professor Piatt. “Keeping up with the speed of change in intellectual property rights is a best practice not just for lawyers, but for anyone in business, management, finance and other disciplines. It is fundamental to maximizing return on investment. The online IAM program is designed to facilitate understanding of IP dynamics, and how best to participate in the upside of IP rights.”

Graduate degrees and certificate programs for non-lawyers have become increasingly popular. Outside of the U.S., they are being offered in such places as Singapore, Tokyo, Strasbourg, France, Sweden, and London. Some leading U.S. universities are now getting involved.

For more information about the Intellectual Asset Management program, including how to register for the Fall classes, which start on September 10, go here. Early application is August 11.

Image source: iam.iit.edu

 

Bold IP Moves Enable Microsoft to Lead in Patent Performance

The inability to dominate in its product lines has not prevented Microsoft from crafting a purposeful IP strategy that has generated billions in patent licensing and enables it to participate other technology businesses’ success.

Microsoft is not you typical technology company. The software business has taken more heat over the past 20 years for what it has not achieved than practically anyone.

While missteps in product development and market strategy have slowed Microsoft’s once meteoric growth and hampered its shares, the time and research spent developing new ideas and protecting them are not without a silver lining.

Microsoft has emerged as a study in smart IP management, and what an evolved business can achieve when it understands the power of selected IP rights and how to deploy it. Not only has MSFT (NASDQ), a laggard with just 300 patents and applications a decade ago, established a formidable portfolio of more than 40,000 patents and a successful licensing program generating about $2 billion annually and likely to generate more, it has displayed a marked ability to move swiftly and deploy its huge cash position when the IP opportunity arises.

“Microsoft: Bold Moves and Intriguing Results,”  will appear as the next Intangible Investor in the January IAM Magazine, out this week. The piece looks at how Microsoft, which has failed to dominate in games (Xbox), operating systems (Windows) or search (Bing) has managed to carve out a formidable niche in IP asset management. A few of the more notable Microsoft IP moves are listed below.

Notable Microsoft IP deals, disputes and investments:

– Purchase/License:
From AOL 925 patents and applications, plus 300 licenses for $1.056M (2012)

– Sale:
To Facebook, 650 patents from the AOL deal for $550M (2012)

– License:
For Adaptix patents from Acacia with Samsung (2012)

– License:
74 smartphone patents from Acacia (2010)

021109_2115_PercentofPa1– License:
To majority of Android smartphone manufacturers for up to $10 per unit (2007-2013)

– Acquisition/License:
From Nokia for $7.2B for its mobile phone and services business. Includes, all of some 30,000 Nokia patents for $2.17B over ten years and licensing income from some Nokia licensees (2013)

– Purchase:
Paid approximately $800M for its participation in Rockstar Consortium’s 6,000
patent Nortel portfolio: with Apple, RIM, Sony, Ericsson and EMC. (2011.)

– Suit Filed re: Above:
Rockstar Consortium US LP and Netstar Technologies LLC vs. Google, 13-893. (November)

– MS has been involved in five of the ten largest patent damages suits (see PwC Patent Litigation Study, figure 2c). It has prevailed in three, settled one, and lost at the United States Supreme Court in another.

– Successful Defense:
Eolas (U. of California) v. MSFT; in a decade-long quest for $500 plus in patent damages.

– Successful Defense:
Alcatel-Lucent v. MSFT, reversed $1.53 billion verdict on appeal (2008)

– Unsuccessful Defense:
i4i v. MSFT, $290 loss at Supreme Court (2011)

– Successful Suit:
Won $14.5M in a case against Motorola Mobility/Google for violating FRAND (2013)

– Plaintiff (settled):
Against Barnes & Noble, Foxconn, and Inventec for patent infringement over the retailer’s
Android-based Nook e-readers and tablets manufactured by Foxconn and Inventec (2010)

– Investment:
In 2011, Microsoft announced that it would invest $300M in B&N’s Nook business for a 17.6
percent stake, which ended their patent litigation

– Investment:
Approximately $1B into Intellectual Ventures fund giving it access to IV’s patents (2002)

– Investment:
1.6% of Facebook (2009)

Transactions compiled by Brody Berman Associates

Image source: reuters.com; patentlyo.com


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