Tag Archives: Amazon
2015

Top patent defendants have faced far fewer suits in 2016, so far

The size of businesses sued most frequently for patent infringement in 2016 were significantly larger than in 2015, when five little-known patent holders were among the top defendants. The amount of litigation also is much lower this year.

Pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly (341) is the top patent litigation defendant in 2016, with a ten-fold lead over number two Samsung (31). No doubt much of Lilly’s defense is the result of ANDA procedures brought by generic drug manufacturers against branded competitors to establish bio-equivalent drugs.

The rest of the list – Amazon, Actavis, AT&T Mobility I, Huawei Technologies, LG Electronics, AT&T, T Mobile USA and Motorola Mobility – all have 21 or fewer suits filed against them so far this year.

2016

This represents a significant drop over last year, according to data supplied by Patexia.com.

Actavis, which acquired Allergan in 2014, is another diversified pharmaceutical company. Actavis is based in Dublin, Ireland, and is a subsidiary of Teva, an Israeli company. Five of the top ten defendants this year are foreign companies. Absent from the 2016 list is Apple and Google, which owns Motorola Mobility.

More Suits Filed Against Unknowns

For the entire 2015, Lilly had 977 patent suits filed against it. That is in contrast with the 341 filed so far this year. Samsung was again number two last year, with 49 cases filed against it.

The rest of the top-ten defendants for 2015 had some less-known names, including: Spin Screed, Sandi Scales, Conlin Properties, Amneal Pharmaceuticals and Lupin Pharmaceuticals. Rounding out last year’s list was H-P, Actavis and Amazon. Only three companies, Samsung, H-P and Amazon, appear to be IT pure-plays.

The number of suits filed against Lilly last year was almost three times higher than 2016 to date, and those for companies in the two through ten spots were about two times higher.

2015

Response to Increased Risk?

The increase in litigation filings against more established patent holders may have to do with the greater likelihood of favorable settlement or payout of damages from them as opposed to smaller players.

It may also have to do with the changing economics of patent litigation which must anticipate the likelihood, time and costs associated with inter partes reviews.

For access to the top-ten patent litigation defendants and the number of suits filed against them from 2007-20016,  go here.

Image source: patexia.com

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New measure of success challenges traditional brand valuations

Measures of a brand’s power can differ dramatically, depending on performance criteria.

A new success index believes that in an increasingly connected world, traditional measures of brand equity are outdated. Criteria like social media strength can be overlooked and under-rated.

The D100, a new brand index from a division of a global advertising agency, believes that some strong brands are less meaningful, while others are not receiving the recognition they deserve.

IPG Mediabrands, the media holding arm of Interpublic Group (NYSE:IPG), in partnership with Jonah Berger, Associate Professor, The Wharton School at The University of Pennsylvania and New York Times best-selling author of Contagious: Why Things Catch On, has launched the inaugural D100, ranking the 100 most dynamic companies in the world using new world metrics.

USA

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The D100 marks the first time that brand success is measured with “new world” metrics, specifically:

  • AGILITY: the degree to which brands adapt to changing market conditions.
  • RESPONSIVENESS: the degree to which a brand listens and responds to customer needs and feedback.
  • INNOVATION: the degree to which brands leverage new technology and creates innovative products and services
  • SOCIABILITY: How large and engaged a brand’s audience is on social media.

Global

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Counter-Intuitive 

There are some notable disconnects within the D100, whose ranking can be viewed nationally or globally. For example, Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, has a dynamic score of 59.89, ranking it 20 globally. Its USA score is just 94. Fitbit is 15 globally, with a 62.75 D rating, and just 62 in the USA.

BMW is ranked 7 globally, 16 in the USA and a lowly 99 in Germany.

Each one of these surprises raises questions about methodology and value.

Germany

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It is interesting to compare the D100 top 10 with InterBrand’s and Forbes’. They are somewhat similar with a few surprises. Those rankings focus more on value. When we get farther down the list we begin to see more significant disruption. Rather than focus on corporate brand, the D100 metrics places more emphasis on brand names associated with specific products.

A branded product may have greater performance value at a given point in time than say an established corporate brand, which may have a high financial valuation.

InterBrand

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To see the global D100, as well as some national rankings, go here. (Tap on the upper right of the screen to pull down the menu.)

UK-based InterBrand’s ranking valuation-oriented brand rankings can be seen here.

Forbes’ top 100 brand values can be found here.

Forbes Top 100

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1,200+ Brands Examined

To construct the D100, over 10,000 consumers were surveyed across four global regions in five major markets including the United States, United Kingdom, Germany, China, and India. Consumers were asked questions on both global brands and market specific brands; in total over 1,200 brands were examined.

Image source: various websites associated with indices


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