Tag Archives: Samsung

China is poised to overtake the U.S. as the leading patent system

A few years ago a company whose patents were violated in China had little or no chance of defending its rights. 

Determined to move beyond its role as a low-cost provider of look-alike consumer products, and establish itself as an innovation leader, China has learned from the successes – and mistakes – of other intellectual property systems, especially the U.S. The nation of 1.4 billion inhabitants has rapidly emerged as what is currently among the fairest and most patent holder-friendly systems in the world.

Chinese patent courts second only, perhaps, to Germany in quickly and fairly adjudicating disputes.

A fascinating article in the current IAM magazine, “Defending a patent case in the brave new world of Chinese patent litigation,” details China’s rapid rise from low-cost copier to a patent power, and a nation that has caught the attention of major global technology powers who are often defendants.

Damages awards are relatively small in China, with median awards currently around 35,000 Renminbi or about $5,000, but injunctions, the power to stop a likely infringing product from being sold, are now issued over 99% of the time to winning parties. NPEs, what some U.S. companies refer to as patent “trolls,” are treated fairly as long as they their patents are of sufficient quality and are the companies are generally supportive of Chinese welfare.

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Patent litigation win rates, according to the article, average around 80%. Startlingly, foreign plaintiffs fare better statistically than Chinese. 

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The U.S. effectively ended the granting of patent injunctions in 2006 with EBay v. MercExchange. Now, only operating companies can obtain them in rare circumstances. This removes most of the leverage afforded patent holders. Granted, injunction abuses are a fact of life, and dubious patents have at times been used to enjoin products, costing companies time and money. But without the power to stop a product from being sold, patents have little meaning.

Race to the Bottom

“Largely as a result of the United States’ race to the bottom in terms of patent enforcement, Germany has emerged as a go-to patent jurisdiction, with virtually guaranteed injunctions, quick time to trial and no discovery resulting in a highly efficient system,” writes Beijing-based Erick Robinson, chief patent counsel, Asia-Pacific for Rouse, a global IP strategy firm.

Patent-holder Win-Rates and Median Damages Awards 

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“Enter China. For years the laughing-stock of all things IP related, the Middle Kingdom was ridiculed for the easy availability of counterfeit handbags, software and DVDs. However, over the last 15 years, and especially in the last two to three, China has put together an extremely effective patent enforcement system. Based largely on the German system and all of its advantages, but with selected portions from US law, China has now become a top forum for patent litigation.”

Unlike most countries which enjoin making, using and selling allegedly infringed products in-country, as well as imports, Chinese law also bans infringing exports from leaving the country. So, for example, if the accused device is Apple’s iPhone, not only can sales of iPhones in China be enjoined, but also exports of the devices from China. This would enable a patent owner to achieve an effective worldwide ban, since iPhones are manufactured in China.

Slippery Slope

With U.S. patent protection significantly diminished over the past decade, and China’s on the rise, the U.S. is on a slippery slope when it comes to stimulating R&D, innovation and investment. It is well on its way to becoming a second-rate patent system, and a slip in disruptive innovation, necessary for the creation of new industries, difficult to measure in real-time, has probably started. Certainly, companies and their stakeholders are thinking twice before pursuing or relying upon USPTO-issued patent protection.

It remains to be seen if China, a continuing source of counterfeit goods that are shipped worldwide, is committed to providing its businesses, as well as those outside of the country, with a legal system that can meet the needs of all business holders, and permit fair and timely resolution of legitimate disputes.

High Win-Rates; Low Damages Awards

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China is now the second largest filer in the U.S. and, while its companies have rarely resorted to filing suits in the U.S. against U.S. companies, there is little doubt that it will do so in the future. Technology giants include Alibaba, Xiaomi, Huawei and Lenovo.

China is likely to be more aggressive enforcing its patents than U.S. frequent-filer Japan, which has been reluctant to engage in domestic or foreign patent disputes. (There are some signs that is changing.) Samsung, by far the largest holder of U.S. patents in the world, has shown a greater willingness use its patents for licensing and leverage.

China may or may not be deliberately attempting to embarrass U.S. and eventually surpass its moribund IP system, but the impact is the same. Continued lack of awareness of what IP rights achieve and for whom, and lobbying, has significantly compromised the once-exemplary U.S. patent system. The Chinese are not too new to capitalism not to see this as an opportunity to compete. For the U.S.’ sake, let’s hope it’s not too late to make invention rights a priority again.

Subscribers can access The brave new world of Chinese patent litigation here.

FUTURE POST: What patent experts believe China’s patent-friendly system means for the U.S. – Experts: Void from U.S. patent “train wreck” is being filled by China’s patent system

Image source: IAM magazine

IP CloseUp visits were up 81% in 2016, breaking previous record

It was the second record-breaking year in a row for IP CloseUp readership, with 43,946 visits in 2016, an 81% increase from 24,273 in 2015. The previous record increase was 31% in 2015, up from 2014.

The most popular51yeitvgpal post was “Kearns’ son still fuming over wiper blade suit,” with 21,652 views. Other popular posts included “For Samsung charity begins at home, Marshall, TX,” coming in with 5,464.

The Kearns article, detailing his 12-year patent suit with Ford and other auto companies, has generated 31,081 hits since it was originally posted in 2011.

Renewed interest in the Kearns biopic detailing the inventor’s patent suit, “Flash of Genius,” starring Greg Kinnear and Alan Alda, likely stimulated interest in the topic, as well as new obstacles to patent licensing.

 

Image source: amazon.com; hippajournal.com

 

Top patent defendants have faced far fewer suits in 2016, so far

The size of businesses sued most frequently for patent infringement in 2016 were significantly larger than in 2015, when five little-known patent holders were among the top defendants. The amount of litigation also is much lower this year.

Pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly (341) is the top patent litigation defendant in 2016, with a ten-fold lead over number two Samsung (31). No doubt much of Lilly’s defense is the result of ANDA procedures brought by generic drug manufacturers against branded competitors to establish bio-equivalent drugs.

The rest of the list – Amazon, Actavis, AT&T Mobility I, Huawei Technologies, LG Electronics, AT&T, T Mobile USA and Motorola Mobility – all have 21 or fewer suits filed against them so far this year.

2016

This represents a significant drop over last year, according to data supplied by Patexia.com.

Actavis, which acquired Allergan in 2014, is another diversified pharmaceutical company. Actavis is based in Dublin, Ireland, and is a subsidiary of Teva, an Israeli company. Five of the top ten defendants this year are foreign companies. Absent from the 2016 list is Apple and Google, which owns Motorola Mobility.

More Suits Filed Against Unknowns

For the entire 2015, Lilly had 977 patent suits filed against it. That is in contrast with the 341 filed so far this year. Samsung was again number two last year, with 49 cases filed against it.

The rest of the top-ten defendants for 2015 had some less-known names, including: Spin Screed, Sandi Scales, Conlin Properties, Amneal Pharmaceuticals and Lupin Pharmaceuticals. Rounding out last year’s list was H-P, Actavis and Amazon. Only three companies, Samsung, H-P and Amazon, appear to be IT pure-plays.

The number of suits filed against Lilly last year was almost three times higher than 2016 to date, and those for companies in the two through ten spots were about two times higher.

2015

Response to Increased Risk?

The increase in litigation filings against more established patent holders may have to do with the greater likelihood of favorable settlement or payout of damages from them as opposed to smaller players.

It may also have to do with the changing economics of patent litigation which must anticipate the likelihood, time and costs associated with inter partes reviews.

For access to the top-ten patent litigation defendants and the number of suits filed against them from 2007-20016,  go here.

Image source: patexia.com

Tech cos use patents to turn up the volume on smarter hearing devices

Aging baby boomers, exposed to a lifetime of loud music, are more demanding than past generations about the quality of what and how they hear.

Don’t expect them to sit by idly watching Mick Jagger mouth the words to Satisfaction.

A group of leading technology companies familiar with consumer lifestyle preferences are helping to reshape the emerging hearables industry. A cross between a tiny wearable and smart prosthetic, it would be unfair to call these devices hearing aids. They are tiny, but powerful, information processors which, 13892-32c56cdb6fd37fccfbd10d1ffb425f54if properly programmed to individual users’ needs, can do far more than merely amplify speech.

Some will be able to offer simultaneous foreign language translations and are fully customizable with a phone app.

360 Million Hearing-Impaired 

Companies vying for leadership in the field include Samsung, Apple, Qualcomm and Google, as well as those already in the business – the so-called ‘big six’, each with decades of practical experience.

For the whole story see “Turning up the volume on hearables,” in the Intangible Investor in IAM magazine’s November issue. Subscribers can find my fully linked report here.

A Google search for hearing-aid–related patents by Apple, Samsung, and Qualcomm showed zero patents 20 years ago but 816 in 2015— slightly more than half of the total patent activities by the Big Six in the same period.

For the “Complete Guide to Hearing Technology in 2016” go here.  For “New Patent Applications: The Sound of Hearables to Come,” go here.

Sound Play

Apple has teamed up with Starkey Hearing Technologies to provide support for the company’s advanced Halo 2 smart device; Daymond John – founder and CEO of fashion brand FUBU, star of reality TV series screen-shot-2016-02-12-at-9-29-50-pm-e1455334928779Shark Tank.”  He told CNN that the technology has changed his life (see video here.)

Google is working on commercializing a high-end in-ear computer, according to press reports based on patent filings. The technology is reportedly part of its secretive new wearable tech initiative, known as Project Aura.

If hearables reach their market potential, vision, memory and other human-assist devices will not be far behind. Forgot what you stated for entertainment on last year’s tax returns? An assistant far smarter than today’s Alexa, Siri or Cortana (Microsoft), and swifter than Google, will be able to find what you need.

Yesterday’s iPod is looking like today’s iHear and tomorrow’s iKnow.

Image source: wearable.com; anewdomain.net

A record number of major holders were granted far fewer US patents

Many significant tech companies experienced dramatic declines in US patent grants, fueling speculation about the reasons why. 

While total patent grants were virtually flat, according to USPTO data, down just 53 patents from 326,032 to 325,979, and utility patent grants and applications were up, many top US holders received significantly fewer US patent grants in 2015. Patent reform and uncertainty are the most likely reasons why.

Notable declines in patents received include Microsoft, off 17.2%, Sony, down 23.8% and AT&T, which dropped 31.3% after increasing 14.4% in 2014. The immediate result has been a noticeable drop in US patent grants received in 2015 by information technology companies, both domestic and foreign based. Japanese companies led the foreign declines.

Businesses of foreign origin were issued a record of 52.8% in 2015 US patents. US company patent applications abroad was likely up.

Digesting the Declines

Fifteen of the top 26 US patent recipients (58%) were granted fewer patents by the USPTO in 2015 than in 2014.  Even IBM, a leading patent recipient for more than two decades, was down by 0.5%. (See IPO top 300.)

Bucking the trend with net increases among top ten patent recipients include Qualcomm, Google GE , Intel and Samsung Display. Biggest percent increases among the top 300 were from NXP Semiconductor (147.9%), Amazon Technologies (53.3%) and Ford Global Technologies (49.1%).

These are in contrast to 2014, when top US-based patent recipients were all up (see 2014-2013 chart below).

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Litigation Down, Too

It is too early to be certain about why the issuance declines among major IT holders are occurring, but if it is in keeping with the recently announced 30.7% drop in patent litigation for the first half of 2016 (see IAM story), a pattern may be emerging.

What this means for some major technology companies is that patent quantity is no longer king. The arms race may be abating, somewhat. It also indicates that US patents mean less today to many companies than in the past, and paying to secure and enforce all but the best few may no longer makes sense. (I will try to cross-check this with US company foreign filing in a future IP CloseUp.)

Decreases in IT company patent filings can be interpreted in several ways.

The Intellectual Property Owners Association (ipo.org) list of top 300 US patent recipients for 2015, published recently, illustrates a downward trend, with some exceptions noted above. It is difficult to tell whether NXP, Amazon and Ford are playing catch up or see an opportunity that others do not. Also, is it that semiconductors, e-commerce and financial transactions, and automotive are inherently more innovative and potentially combative.

“A combination of factors”

Clearly there are many IP rights in portfolios that should never have been issued, and would be invalidated under further review. Also, patents are less reliable than ever, so why bother? It may be that some companies want to rely on fewer, better quality patents, for freedom of action, but it also may be that they see less value in obtaining them or in identifying new inventions.

“It is a combination of factors,” one veteran patent attorney and analyst told IP CloseUp. “Businesses are seeking better patent quality, and chartoftheday_4260_top_10_patent_recipients_n
USPTO examinations are getting somewhat tougher. Also, there is 
pressure on software patents from the courts, frequent PTAB invalidity rulings, and a general anti-patent environment. Weaker corporate balance sheets also have led to cost cutting.”

The America Invents Act and PTAB reviews have made it much more difficult to license patents, and have diminished their defensive value, too. Patents role in some businesses’ corporate strategy and ROI is under scrutiny.

Interestingly, despite the 2015 drop in patents to top holders, corporate patent buying activity was relatively high. Rock bottom prices may have made portfolio purchases attractive to some.

Patent-dubious Google, which has been an active buyer through various programs (e.g. experimental Patent Purchase Program), as well as a more active filer, experienced a 10.9% increase in patents received in 2015. In 2014, it was up by 31.6%.

Image source: patentdocs.com; aulainip.com; statista.com

 

 

 

Symantec acquires Blue Coat, a leading IPR filer with a $289M loss

Cybersecurity firm Blue Coat Systems has decided to opt-out of an initial public offering and sell itself to software security leader Symantec for $4.65 billion. 

What has not been widely reported in the press is that Blue Coat, a relatively small cybersecurity company with a loss of $289 million in 2015, is a leading filer of United States Patent and Trademark Office Inter Partes Reviews (IPRs) that are designed to invalidate patents that are being asserted by Non-Practicing Entities (NPEs) and others.

According to patent research firm Patexia, Blue Coat is a top-ten IPR filer for 2016, along with Apple, Samsung, Microsoft and GE. The firm filed ten IPRs, a higher numbers than H-P for the period.

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“Blue Coat has been at war with Finjan,” Gaston Kroub of Markman Advisors, LLC told IP CloseUp.  “Like Blue Coat, Symantec has been fighting with Finjan too, so these IPR’s may be of value to Symantec as well.”

Top 10 IPR Petitioners_2

Finjan (FNJN) is among the leading targets for IPRs. It could be that Symantec finds Blue Coat attractive not only for its cybersecurity products, but also for its adversarial position with regard to Finjan and others which could assert their patents against it or Blue Coat.

In a 2015 verdict in Finjan Inc. v Blue Coat Systems, a jury awarded Finjan more than $39.5 million in damages, reports IP Watchdog. The lawsuit alleged that claims from a series of Finjan patents were infringed by several Blue Coat products, including Malware Analysis Appliance (MAA), Content Analysis System (CAS), and WebPulse.

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To help finance the transaction, Blue Coat’s existing majority investor, Bain Capital, will invest an additional $750 million in the deal. The private equity firm Silver Lake, which invested $500 million in Symantec in February, will invest an additional $500 million.

Bain had acquired the company for $2.4B in 2015.

According to The New York Times, “The deal will create a big provider of security products, both the traditional antivirus kind that has long been Symantec’s focus and the newer online protection services in which Blue Coat has specialized. Executives see little overlap between the two businesses.”

“With this transaction, we will have the scale, portfolio and resources necessary to usher in a new era of innovation designed to help protect large customers and individual consumers against insider threats and sophisticated cybercriminals,” Dan Schulman, Symantec’s chairman stated.

In its I.P.O. prospectus, Blue Coat said that it lost $289 million on top of the $598 million in sales for the 12-month-period that ended on April 30. That compares to a $271 million loss on top of nearly $569 million in sales for the same period a year before.

Image source: twitter.com/symantec; patexia.com

Samsung is the leading US patent holder, 24,000 ahead of IBM

Of the top eleven active US patent holders, only four are American companies.

But who gets the best return on their innovation rights is less clear. 

It is no surprise that many foreign companies are significant US patent holders. The leader in active US patents, Samsung, with 63,434, is now more than 24,000 issued invention rights ahead of the American leader, IBM, with 39,436. But US patentees are learning that they do not all need to be top banana to succeed.

What this tells us is that for some companies – especially foreign ones – the quantity of US patents still counts, even if quality appears to be somewhat of a moving target. And besides, big technology companies seldom put their patents to the test. US-Patents

“Depending on the stage of a corporation’s development, intellectual property may be a primary value driver,” according to an article, “The largest US patent portfolios are shrinking,” by Michael Chernoff of MDB Capital in the May IAM magazine.

“This list provides insight as to whether a company’s portfolio has been growing and the impact that those assets appear to be having within their technology verticals.”

Big and Growing

Of the top 100 holders, Alphabet (Google) had one of the highest three-year compound annual (patent) growth rates (CAGR), 16%. They were outdone only by Apple, 19%, Ford, 19% and Taiwan Semiconductor at 22%. Huawei’s CAGR was a 26%, but on a lower base.

Alphabet is #12 and Apple #26 on the top 100 active US patentees list. Microsoft is now four, displacing Panasonic.

Seven entities moved up the ladder and made it onto the US Patent 100 list during the last year: Avago Technologies (36), Kyocera (81), Merck (84), Huawei (86) Caterpillar (97), EMC Corp (98) and Halliburton (100). While most of these new entrants won their place as a result of sustained IP development, some are due to significant acquisitions, as noted in Chernoff’s article. (I understand that Google also, has been an active acquirer.)

Getting vs. Having 

While IBM has received the most patents granted by the USPTO every year for the past twenty years, or so, it does not have the most active US patents. Samsung does, and Canon has inched ahead of IBM.

2015-Patents-Top-Ten-IBM

This is one area where lack of leadership can be strength. IBM allows many patents to lapse once it knows that rivals will not secure them or they are not likely to provide much value. The company also generates many defensive publications that prevent others from securing patents on inventions it may wish to use or build trade secrets (consulting “know-how”) around.

Because IBM is more selective and may have a greater number of quality assets than some of its foreign rivals, the company’s patent portfolio is likely more relevant for out and cross-licensing, and occasional sales, which in past years it has engaged in with the likes of Facebook, Twitter and Google. Fewer active US patents also means lower maintenance costs.

Image source: http://www.diyphotography.net; www.thenextsiliconvalley.com

Survey: Almost half of all 2015 patent suits were filed in E.D. Texas

The Eastern District of Texas (E.D. Tx.) is responsible for almost half of all patent suits filed in 2015, and one judge, Rodney Gilstrap, is handling 80% of the cases, 1,686 of them. 

This is part of the findings of the latest “Patent Litigation Year in Review” just out from IP analytics firm Lex Machina.

The 2,540 cases filed in E.D. Tx. in 2015 represent 43.7% of all cases filed. In 2014, that number was 28%, from which there was a 56% increase.

According to Brian Howard, a legal data scientist with Lex Machina, “at least part of the increase in E.D. Tx. suits is a result of high volume filers, those with ten or more cases, who either are located in Texas or may find E.D. Tx. courts and juries more hospitable.”

Plaintiffs

E.D. Tx. saw a 78.0% increase (1,113) in cases, and N.D. Tx. 84.1% (54), while D. Del. had a 42.4% decrease in cases (401).

Information about top plaintiffs who are mass filers, some of whom give NPEs a bad name, is difficult to obtain. One of them eDekka, LLC, was responsible for the most suits filed in 2015. Edekka was plaintiff on 101 suits in 2015.  In December the E.D. Tx. cited eDekka for attorney’s fees

The Court concluded that “eDekka repeatedly offered insupportable arguments on behalf of an obviously weak patent” and questioned whether eDekka thoroughly evaluated its claims against relevant law before initiating a large number of lawsuits.

Top defendants in 2015 according to Lex Machina included, in addition to Samsung and Apple, four pharmaceutical companies, Mylan, Activis, Amneal and Apotex. This is more than in the past two years, due largely to ANDAs, Abbreviated New Drug Applications for patents on U.S. generic drugs or bio-equivalents for an existing licensed medication. Howard said that these cases are often more about procedure than current or past infringement and are often settled.

Reasonable Royalties Rule

Median damages awards were up significantly in 2015 to $5,443,485 in 29 cases calculated on reasonable royalties, a more than 17-fold increase from 2013 when the median was $311,379. Lost profits awards were down to just $423,079 in five cases. In 2013 they were $5.5 million (see figure 47 on page 28 of the report).

Of the 2,488 IPRs filed since September 16, 2012, the start of the PTAB reviews, to the end of 2015, better than one in three were either denied institution (22%) or settled (13%). In 3%, all claims were affirmed. Of those instituted, all claims were found unpatentable 18% of the time. Only 0.1% of of the instituted petitions were claims amended.

IPRstats

Prior to institution, petitions were either settled or procedurally dismissed 28% of the time.

For a personal copy of the full Lex Machina 2015 litigation report go here.

To register for a live webinar to review the highlights of the report on March 24, go here

Image source: Lex Machina

Technology companies back as top patent defendants in 2016

While it may seem like all of the patent infringement targets are large technology companies in 2015, at least 7 of the top 10 defendants were less well-known or in the pharmaceutical business. 

According to Patexia, a California patent research firm, the top defendants in patent law suits in 2015 were in descending order: Apple, Samsung, Spin Screed, Mylan Pharmaceuticals, Sandi Scales, Conlon Properties, HP, Mylan, Actavis and Amneal Pharmaceuticals. 

Apple was defendant in 51 cases in 2015, while the lowest of the top ten, Amneal, was defendant in 31 suits.

Patexia Graph

Spin Speed is a construction tools company. Sandi Scales is a Georgia company doing business as Sandi Scales Etching Company. An extensive Internet search revealed no background on Conlon Properties.

Mylan Pharmaceutical, Mylan, Actavis and Amneal are all pharma or pharma-related business. Apple, Samsung and HP are primarily consumer electronics companies.

2016

For 2016 to date, however, the top patent defendants is comprised entirely of tech or e-commerce companies, most with a consumer focus: Expedia, Apple, AT&T Mobility, T-Mobile US, Huawei USA, Samsung, HP, T-Mobile USA,  ZTE and Huawei.

For access to the 2015 and 2016 top defendants list go here.

Image source: patexia.com

 

Annual report: IP CloseUp visits are up 32% in 2015 to 24,000


2015 was a year of growth for IP CloseUp, as visits increased to 24,000 and subscriptions were up, too.

The busiest day of the year was Christmas Day when there were 482 views of Kearns’ Son Still Fuming Over Wiper Blade Fight.”

The post about the continued anger of inventor Robert Kearns family over his treatment by automobile makers, depicted in the movie, “Flash of Genius,” was the most popular for 2015, with, with 6,760 visits. It continues to be a marshall.11-640x480perennial favorite.

Other popular IP CloseUp posts for 2015 were “For Samsung charity begins at ‘home’; Midland, TX,”

“Leading brands increasingly have the most valuable patents,”

“Silicon Valley: Too big to fail, or too big not to?” and

“Low R&D cost per patent is a poor indicator of Flash_of_genius_post[1]good return.”

The most avid readers were from the U.S., Canada and the UK, followed by Germany, Australia, India, Brazil, the Netherlands and Japan. In all, readers from 131 countries accessed IPCU posts in 2015.

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Thank you readers for making IP CloseUp one of the most respected IP blogs, followed not just by IP professionals, but by investors, business executives and journalists.

Readers: Please keep sending your comments – We love hearing from you!

Image source: ipcloseup.com

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More patent holders (and buyers) are valuing perception over reality

Lack of certainty and the high cost of monetizing patents are motivating some businesses to acquire impressive looking patents, not necessarily valid or essential ones.  

A reputation for innovation or R&D prowess has become a far more valuable asset since the American Invents Act was passed a few years ago.

IBM, among others, has sold unproven patents for tens of millions of dollars to the likes of Alibaba, Twitter, Facebook and Google, attesting to the power of source brand when it comes to invention rights.

In all but a handful of instances, no one gives a hoot about what an IT patent is really worth in the marketplace or even whether it is valid. There Perception-Realityis nothing new about securing batches of patents for affect, especially if it is unlikely that they will be enforced and subject to the scrutiny of litigation.

With licensing revenue down and patent sale prices 30% or more lower, there is little motivation for an alleged infringer to take a licence or settle a dispute.  The search is on to identify alternative methods of profiting from IP. Drawing upon a portfolio or family’s implied value can have more meaning than its actual worth — which is becoming increasingly more difficult to establish.

As Good as Gold

In the current (November) IAM The Intangible Investor looks at “Perception is reality for some patent holders.”

A golden reputation for innovation is easier to establish than value for most individual rights. Thus, a patent portfolio or family in conjunction with a recognizable brand can constitute a formidable pairing. “Perceived patent value” holders, those with a
reputation for innovation, may be in a better position to profit today than business that actually hold valid and infringed patents. Proven patents need to survive the PTAB and perform in court, and require capital to monetize; a reputation for IP can be built over time and managed.

We may recall the Intel Inside® advertising campaign of a decade or more ago that touted the branded processor inside the PC. It not only encouraged product sales but provided the company with the ability to license at a premium the patents covering the component.

There was less a qualitative difference in the microprocessor (vs. say AMD’s) than an implied one based on Intel’s consciously cultivated, and largely deserved, reputation for innovation. 4If issued patents are even less reliable than in the past, then invention rights that appear to be good are the biggest winners. It is no coincidence that the most significant R&D spenders also happen to be among the world’s most valuable brands and significant patent holders. The top ones exceed or are just under $10 billion in annual R&D spend.

Reputation, whether it is deserved or not, makes buying decisions easier — a welcome relief to at least some cash-rich buyers in the market for coverage who cannot wait for patents to issue.

The full IAM piece, “Perception is reality for some patent holders,” can be found here.

Image source: askskipper.com; wparesearch.com

Vision meets commerce is focus of the 50th LES annual meeting in NY

Big Ideas: The Intersection of Innovation & Business is the theme of  this years Licensing Executives Society annual meeting to be held in New York, October 25-28.

Speakers from  Google, GE Ventures, J&J, Columbia Technology Ventures and Samsung will participate in the plenaries at this year’s 50th anniversary meeting at the Marriott Marquis.

Plenary Session – “Big Money is Back”

A cross industry panel of experts will explore and discuss how the changing financial climate is impacting innovation. There is money out there so, what are stakeholders doing and how is investment and licensing shaping innovation?

Speakers:
Orin Herskowitz, Executive Director, Columbia Technology VenturesVice President for Intellectual Property & Technology Transfer, Adjunct Professor, Columbia Business and Engineering Schools (Moderator)
Sang Ahn, Managing Director, Global Innovation Center, Samsung Electronics
Patrick Patnode, General Counsel, GE Ventures and Healthymagination
James Sledzik, Energy Ventures US, Inc.

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IP CloseUp’s Bruce Berman will be moderating a panel on Tuesday October 27, at 3:45 focusing on patent quality.

“Defining Patent Quality – Distinguishing Between Validity, Value and Invention Quality”

Patent quality has become more than a simple black or white definition of validity. Patent quality is often in the eye of the beholder. Some believe there is an inevitable market component or need associated with patent quality, which affects its defensive, licensing and sales value. This workshop will look at the changing definition of patent quality and the role that the PTAB and recent decisions like Alice have played. The workshop also will examine the influence of market forces like demand on patent quality and in distinguishing patent quality from value.

Speakers:
Bruce Berman, Brody Berman Associates (Moderator)
Julia Elvidge, President, Chipworks
Christi Guerrini, Baylor College of Medicine; University of Houston Law Center
Sean Reilly, Askeladden. L.L.C./ the Clearing House Payments Company

Christi Guerrini is the author of a provocative paper on patent quality, “Defining Patent Quality.” She teaches ethics as Baylor College of Medicine Center for Medical Ethics and is a Fellow at the University of Houston Law Center; Julia Elvidge heads one of the leading patent analysis firms, and Sean Reilly, is General Counsel and director of IP strategy for Askeladden, LLC and The Clearing House. He is also chief strategist of the Patent Quality Initiative. TCH members are many of the largest banks in the world.

Be sure to stop by on Tuesday afternoon for what promises to be a thought-provoking panel.

For the full meeting agenda, including more than 50 workshops and special events, go here.

To register online, go here.

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Lawrence (Larry) J. Udell, inventor, lecturer and creator of more than 40 new ventures, has been named the 2015 Frank Barnes Mentor Award recipient by the Licensing Executives Society (USA & Canada), Inc. The award will be presented during the Society’s upcoming Annual Meeting in New York.

Mr. Udell has been an active member of the Licensing Executives Society since 1982 and is the founder and chairman emeritus of the Silicon Valley Chapter of LES www.les-svc.org. He also resurrected the San Francisco Chapter five years ago. He is the founder and chairman of the California Invention Center (1995) www.CaliforniaInventionCenter.org. Mr. Udell is associated with several Hall of Fame inventors, including James Ferguson (he developed the LCD or Light Crystal Display) and Forrest Bird (portable ventilator).

Image source: lesusacanada.org

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