Tag Archives: IPRs

Pace of patent litigation declines; 2018 applications still flat

Early indications are that U.S. patent litigation for 2018 is on track to be among the lowest in since 2005.

So far in 2018, approximately 555 patent infringement suits have been filed (3,330 on an annualized basis). This is off from a peak of 5,874 in 2015, or an average of 979 every two months. In 2005, the lowest litigation filing year in recent memory, there were just 2,582 suits. In 2017, there were 4,072. January and February are early indications, and there is time for the rate to increase.

According to statistics provided by intellectual property research firm Patexia, January 2018 patent applications came in at 27,720, just 631 higher than 2017, 27,089, which was the lowest year for that month since 2012. February applications are running behind last year, which came in at 28,329 for the same month. Final figures are not yet in.

This trend in patent applications and litigation has been accompanied by a flattening of Inter Partes Review (IPR) petitions filed. IPRs have been fairly level for the past three years, peaking in 2017 at 1,725. So far this year (through February) there have been approximately 250 IPRs filed, putting 2018 on track for about 1,500, slightly below the last two years on an annualized basis. No information on the number or percentage of instituted petitions was provided.

Litigation, IPRs and CBMs Filed to Date

IPRs and Litigation

Difficulty obtaining software and business methods patents are a likely reason for the drop in U.S. patent applications, as well as the increased difficulty defending patents. Patent uncertainty and decreased need for defendants to take a license or engage in licensing discussions, as well as the high cost of litigation, are possible reasons for an increase in IPRs.

For Patexia live litigation statistics, go here.

Image source: patexia.com

Symantec acquires Blue Coat, a leading IPR filer with a $289M loss

Cybersecurity firm Blue Coat Systems has decided to opt-out of an initial public offering and sell itself to software security leader Symantec for $4.65 billion. 

What has not been widely reported in the press is that Blue Coat, a relatively small cybersecurity company with a loss of $289 million in 2015, is a leading filer of United States Patent and Trademark Office Inter Partes Reviews (IPRs) that are designed to invalidate patents that are being asserted by Non-Practicing Entities (NPEs) and others.

According to patent research firm Patexia, Blue Coat is a top-ten IPR filer for 2016, along with Apple, Samsung, Microsoft and GE. The firm filed ten IPRs, a higher numbers than H-P for the period.


“Blue Coat has been at war with Finjan,” Gaston Kroub of Markman Advisors, LLC told IP CloseUp.  “Like Blue Coat, Symantec has been fighting with Finjan too, so these IPR’s may be of value to Symantec as well.”

Top 10 IPR Petitioners_2

Finjan (FNJN) is among the leading targets for IPRs. It could be that Symantec finds Blue Coat attractive not only for its cybersecurity products, but also for its adversarial position with regard to Finjan and others which could assert their patents against it or Blue Coat.

In a 2015 verdict in Finjan Inc. v Blue Coat Systems, a jury awarded Finjan more than $39.5 million in damages, reports IP Watchdog. The lawsuit alleged that claims from a series of Finjan patents were infringed by several Blue Coat products, including Malware Analysis Appliance (MAA), Content Analysis System (CAS), and WebPulse.


To help finance the transaction, Blue Coat’s existing majority investor, Bain Capital, will invest an additional $750 million in the deal. The private equity firm Silver Lake, which invested $500 million in Symantec in February, will invest an additional $500 million.

Bain had acquired the company for $2.4B in 2015.

According to The New York Times, “The deal will create a big provider of security products, both the traditional antivirus kind that has long been Symantec’s focus and the newer online protection services in which Blue Coat has specialized. Executives see little overlap between the two businesses.”

“With this transaction, we will have the scale, portfolio and resources necessary to usher in a new era of innovation designed to help protect large customers and individual consumers against insider threats and sophisticated cybercriminals,” Dan Schulman, Symantec’s chairman stated.

In its I.P.O. prospectus, Blue Coat said that it lost $289 million on top of the $598 million in sales for the 12-month-period that ended on April 30. That compares to a $271 million loss on top of nearly $569 million in sales for the same period a year before.

Image source: twitter.com/symantec; patexia.com

PTAB instituted IPRs are flat after declining slightly in 2015

After declining 9% in 2015 from the 2014 fiscal year Patent Trial and Appeal Board-instituted inter partes reviews (IPRs) have leveled off.

Instituted reviews were at 74% in 2014, went to 65% in 2015 and are thus far at 66% for fiscal year 2016. This is according to, “PTAB Grants Lower Rare of IPRs as Patent Owners Fight Back,” by Erin Coe in Law 360.

Coe reports that patent holders have “an 86 percent chance of seeing the PTAB find some or all of the instituted claims unpatentable, according to the total number of IPR trials that reached final decisions in the review period.”

The declining rate has been attributed to among other things, improved quality of the patents being put before the PTAB, although it still is reviewing about two-thirds of the patents that petitioners request.

An analysis through August 2015 showed that instituted reviews result in invalidation of one or more claims 88% of the time; invalidity success rate for patents with fully instituted petitions is 82%.














The Kill Rate Analysis

According to Amy Simpson and Hwa Lee, attorneys at Perkins Coie LLP, the key take-aways or recent IPR activity:

1. Very few petitioners are walking away empty-handed: 88 percent of petitions with final written decisions resulted in at least one claim being invalidated.

2. A notable percentage — 21 percent — of all final written decisions resulted in complete invalidation of the patent.

3. Success starts and ends with the petition. The invalidity success rate for fully instituted petitions is 82 percent while the invalidity success rate for partially instituted petitions plummets to 52 percent. The PTAB’s first impression of the petition’s strength appears to affect the entire preceding and ultimate outcome.

Simpson and Lee analyzed all of the approximately 404 final written decisions on instituted IPRs from September 2012 through Aug. 1, 2015 to explore the factors behind IPR kill rates.

Image source: Law360.com via USPTO

NPEs are winning 4.5x more in damages than opcos, new PwC patent litigation study shows

With patent litigation down 13% over 2013, and median damages awards just $2.9 million, the lowest in at least 20 years, NPEs are still besting operating companies in damages at trial by more than four fold.

PwC’s 2015 annual patent litigation study, subtitled “A change in patentee fortunes,” is a useful overview of trends in the IP space. The annual study is long on the big picture and short of reasons for changes. There is some attempt this year at a summary page and suggested implications (“Leading Observations”), which runs before the Table of Contents.

Median damages awards for NPEs over the period from 2010-2014 were $8.9M, compared to just $2.0M (page four of the 2015 study) for operating companies (opcos). Reasons for this may include: SMEs that tend to enforceScreen Shot 2015-05-22 at 10.41.50 AM their patents against competitors, not the deepest pockets, have more modest goals; and simply that NPEs are better at enforcing patents, with more experience targeting big companies than opcos, and are able to identify better quality patents to enforce.

The drop in litigation over 2013, already much discussed, can be attributed to may things, the PTAB and IPRs, Alice, less favorable large damages awards, longer time to trial, etc. Possibly overlooked is that after AIA was instituted in 2012 there was a rush to file suits, possibly to avoid IPR scrutiny.

The 2015 PwC Patent Litigation Study can be found here.

Image source: PwC

Study: Alice v. CLS Bank led to a strong increase in subject matter patent invalidations

The Supreme Court’s decision in Alice Corporation v. CLS Bank International, a case involving computer software, has led to a marked increase in patents being invalidated under Section 101 of Title 35 the United States Code covering subject matter eligibility.

The findings are part of “2014 Patent Litigation Year in Review,” just out from Lex Machina, the litigation analytics firm.

fig 37

Surprisingly, according to the findings in the report, median damages awards based on reasonable royalties paid in 2014 was $3M based on 25 cases. This was the second highest amount since 2000, with only 2009 being higher.

39% of IPRs Settled before a Final Decision

The Lex Machina 2014 review indicates that of the 503 IPRs terminated between 2012 and 2014, 196 or 39% were settled before a final decision was made by the PTAB. (See figure 47 below.)

The 2014 litigation report examines the key axes of legal data and their interactions, drawing upon Lex Machina’s platform that combines data from PACER, PTAB, the U.S International Trade Commission (ITC) , and the U.S. Food Drug Administration (FDA) Orange Book on abbreviated new drug applications (ANDAs).

fig 36

IPCU readers interested in receiving “2014 Patent Litigation Year in Review” can follow the link here.

fig 47

Lex Machina also recently announced the launch of Legal Analytics for trademark and copyright cases, which affords lawyers insights into the behavior of district court judges, opposing parties, and opposing counsel, enabling them to gain competitive advantage in trademark and copyright litigation.

Image source: Lex Machina

Post-Grant Reviews are Shaping NPE Patent Quality & Portfolio Size

More and better patents have greater meaning for licensors now that a petitioner can seek an internal review (IPR) canceling a patent because of a single claim. Expect those with capital and experience to prevail.

IPNav announced in May that the firm’s President, Deirdre Leane, is set to succeed CEO Erich Spangenberg by the end of the year.

Leane spoke with IPBC Global’s Richard Lloyd recently in Amsterdam about the future of patent licensing and the impact that Inter Partes Reviews (IPRs) are having on patent licensing. Leane also chatted about the a more expanded role for women in IP and her increased responsibilities at IPNav.



She says the IPR pendulum has already starting to swing back in favor of patent holders. Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) decisions have gone from “a 90% plus kill rate to 82%,” Leane notes.

Leane believes that trend is likely to continue to move towards 70%, as patent holders select better patents to assert.

For those of you who wish to go directly to Leane’s remarks about IPRs, they start a bit after 2:00 in the 13 minute interview. The entire interview can be found here.

Image source: ipbcglobal.com

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