Harvard study: financial patents lag in quality, especially NPEs’

A recently published Harvard Business School working paper found that financial services patents lack quality because they lag their peers in academic citations.

“Financial Patent Quality: Finance Patents After State Street”  findings indicate that financial services patents are questionable with regard to their references to academic prior art. The study’s findings also show that patents awarded to individuals and associated with non-practicing entities (NPEs) cite less academic prior art, and that financial services patents with fewer of these citations are more likely to be asserted in litigation.

The research also shows that financial services patents cite less non-patent pristacked_1200px_130327or art, and especially less academic prior art.

Patents assigned to individuals and NPEs were particularly problematic with respect to academic citations.
Having fewer academic prior art citations, the HBS study indicates, directly correlates to the likelihood of a financial services patent being the subject of litigation.

Not all patent professionals agree that the number or type of citations play a significant role in determining patent quality or the likelihood that a patent will be enforced.

The study team was led by Josh Lerner, a professor at Harvard Business School and co-author of Innovation and Its Discontents: How Our Broken Patent System is Endangering Innovation and Progress, and What to do About It.

“Financial Patent Quality” concludes that:

  • Financial services patents cite fewer non-patent prior art publications than the comparison groups. This is especially the case with respect to academic prior art publications.
  • Patents awarded to corporations generally cite more prior art, particularly academic research than do those awarded to individuals or associated with NPEs.
  • Citations of academic prior art are strongly related to whether a finance patent is litigated. In particular, financial services patents with more academic citations, one indicator of higher quality, were subject to less litigation.

The HBS working paper was sponsored by Askeladden L.L.C.  as part of its Patent Quality Initiative, an 294628LOGOeducation, information and advocacy effort with the goal of improving the understanding, use and reliability of patents in financial services and elsewhere. Askeladden is a subsidiary or The Clearing House, the oldest banking association in the United States.

According to Bloomberg BNA the study selected finance patents from specific subclasses of the PTO’s classification code 705, titled, “Data Processing: Financial, Business Practice, Management, or Cost/Price Determination.” Most of the claims of the finance patents involve data processing on generic computing equipment and are, thus, likely to be claimed as software algorithms.

To see the HBS working paper, “Financial Patent Quality,” go here.

Image source: hbs.edu 

About Bruce Berman

Independent IP observer, adviser and author.

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