Tag Archives: 5G

Apple conspired to discredit Qualcomm’s inventions even though it believed they were “the best”

Nothing gives a Silicon Valley tech giant, once, known for quality and integrity, a bad name like greed and deception. In pursuit of even greater profit, Apple’s actions cost more than 1,000 people their jobs and almost brought down a $100 billion supplier. 

A long-time licensee of Qualcomm’s high-quality modems, Apple came to dislike the terms of the deal it had signed.

The settlement of the recent high-profile patent dispute between the companies appears have been motivated primarily by two things:

  • potential loss of future 5G revenue once it was revealed that Intel could not provide the modems it needs and
  • fear of public embarrassment and legal retribution for having revealed that Apple lied to break the contract with Qualcomm and cheat it out of licensing royalties.

This is an incredibly sad story for anyone who believes that unfair competition is a threat to free enterprise or that Apple represents the American technology leadership.

A Plan to Discredit

According to the Washington Post and other news sources, Apple entered into a systematic plan to discredit Qualcomm inventions and patents in a bid to reduce the cost of licensing them. This occurred while apple was generating between $40 billion and $160 billion in annual iPhone revenues (see graph).

Apple is among the wealthiest companies. Despite the potential legal risk in launching its shady “royalty reduction plan,” it apparently believed the plan represented little real legal threat to the company. Apple could lie about the patents because it could afford to lose – if it was caught. This is known as “efficient” patent infringement, i.e. it pays for some businesses to forgo a license to inventions it needs because today infringers are rarely caught or sufficiently punished.

Last year Apple became the first company to reach a market capitalization of more than $1 trillion and has $245 billion of cash on hand. It could well-afford to pay Qualcomm what it had agreed to, even thought it was a significant sum. The risks were larger for Qualcomm. The San Diego company’s stock price plummeted and it was forced to lay off 1,500 employees.

With the recent legal settlement, 2020 iPhones will support 5G networks with Qualcomm chips the primary of two 5G modem suppliers for the devices, according to analyst Ming-Chi Kuo. Samsung will be another supplier.

VentureBeat ran an excellent piece summarizing Apple’s dubious behavior. It and the Washington Post piece (linked above) are essential reading for anyone interested in technology, intellectual property or business. Read it here.

Private Memos

It has been reported that Qualcomm stands to generate from the settlement $9 per handset, which is as much as $6 billion in revenues or, $2 per share in earnings from the litigation settlement. It stock has risen some 30%. Apple was able to threaten the very existence of a $100 billion U.S. company, whose products it loved but did not want to pay for.

In private memos and other documents that came out after the settlement was reached it was revealed that Apple colluded to “plot and pressure” Qualcomm, a long-time Apple licensor, to reduce the cost of its licenses. Apple went so far as to put pressure on its suppliers to lie about the Qualcomm modem quality and pricing.

Poor Character

While Apple was paying Qualcomm to license its inventions, iPhone sales were breaking records (see graph above). It could well afford to pay the agreed upon price that for the best modems — it simply did not want to and believed it could force Qualcomm to “renegotiate” by discrediting its quality and lying about what others were paying.

Take five minutes to read the Washington Post and VentureBeat articles. You will not see Apple or its products the same way again.

 

Image source: VentureBeat, Qualcomm

 

 

INTA Annual Mtg set for mid-May; $300/€300 discounts for ‘Auto IP US’ and Europe, also in May

May is a busy month for IP events. The 141st International Trademark Association Meeting (INTA) will take place in Boston, and Auto IP conferences will be held in Munich and Detroit.

More than 10,000 trademark practitioners, brand owners, and intellectual property professionals from 150 countries will be in Boston, Massachusetts May 18–22 for the  141st Annual Meeting of the International Trademark Association, the largest  industry gathering of its type.

With 300+ educational sessions, the meeting will explore topics that reflect advances in innovation and technology, changing consumer perceptions about brands, and the rising tide of counterfeits. In addition, the program goes beyond trademarks to cover other IP rights.

For information about the INTA meeting, including the agenda and registration page, go here.

Auto IP USA and Europe

Building on three years of success in Detroit, IAM’s Auto IP USA on May 8 will bring together the leading IP experts from across the automotive landscape. Through thought leadership, discussion and networking, attendees will gain insight into the IP challenges facing those driving change in the new era of mobility.

Alliances have become a template for the auto industry, encouraging innovation and collaboration in a way that differs from full mergers and limited cooperation deals. However, these partnerships create complex IP issues around the assets that the parties already own as opposed to what new products they may create together.

Returning to Munich on May 16 for its second year, Auto IP Europe will offer IP professionals in the automotive industry the opportunity to hear expert strategies from the complete supply chain – from the OEMs and industry suppliers, to the innovators in high-tech and connectivity.

Auto IP USA background can be found here. IP CloseUp readers who use discount code IPCU300 receive $300 off the registration fee (more than a 30% discount).

Auto IP Europe agenda and speakers are here. IP CloseUp readers who use discount code IPCU300 receive €300 off the registration fee.

Image source: inta.org; iam-events.com; gistmania.com

 

$300 discount on IP Business Congress Boston for IPCU readers

The IP Business Congress Global, among intellectual property’s premier annual events, is providing a large segment of IP CloseUp readers a registration break for the upcoming event, June 16-18, at the Westin Waterfront in Boston.

This year’s IPBC Global program features over 70 speakers, more than 650 attendees and twelve hours of networking time.

Speakers include Erich Andersen, Microsoft; Paul Coletti, Johnson & Johnson; Jako Eleveld, Royal Philips; Juan C. Gonzalez, Mastercard; John Mulgrew, Uber Technologies; Michael Lee, Google; David Pridham, Dominion Harbor; Terry Rea, USPTO; Karen A. Sinclair, Harvard University; Wayne Sobon, Juul Labs; Maria Varsellona, Nokia; and Gilbert Wong, Facebook. HP and Ericsson also will be presenting.

Sessions include:

  • IP in the 5G era
  • Women in deal making
  • Insider the 21st Century IP team
  • Five years on from Alice
  • The investors’ perspective
  • Insider the global IP market
  • Blockchain in focus

By using the registration code, IPCU300, IPCU readers can save $300. The discount cannot be redeemed by IP service providers, as the service provider quota for IPBC Global has been reached.

For the entire speaker list, go here.

For the IPBC Global 2019 program, go here.

For an attendee break down, here.

To register, please visit go this this link.

 

Image source: ipbc.com; facebook: westinbostonwaterfront

LES annual meeting to be held in Boston October 14-17

The birthplace of innovation, Boston, is the site for the 2018 Licensing Executives Society meeting.

The opening session, “Advancing Innovation Through a Renewal of Trust,” will feature Andrei Iancu, USPTO Director, Bill Elkington, Senior Director – IP Management, Rockwell Collins and Walter Copan, National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) Director and Under Secretary of Commerce for Standards and Technology.

Other sessions include:

  • Funding Startups – The Boston Perspective
  • Increasing ROI for Government-Funded Research
  • Advanced Telecommunications Licensing, 4G, 5G and LTE for Automobiles
  • US or Them – Who is Going to Set Standards for Licensing
  • Patenting Machine Learning
  • 2018 Tax Consequences: Coordination of IP Monetization and Tax Planning
  • Life Sciences Partnering Performance and Reputation Survey Results
  • Maximizing IP Value and Minimizing Risk in M&A Transactions

For the full 2018 LES annual meeting agenda, go here. For the speaker biographies, please visit http://www.lesmeetings.org/am18/speakers/

To register, go here.

Image source: lesmeetings.org 

Qualcomm counter-offensive reminds NY Times readers who put the ‘smart’ in smartphone

Qualcomm is the first known patent licensor to tout its invention prowess in a New York Times ad directed at the business community. 

One of the world’s most successful licensing businesses reminded Times readers – in a sparsely worded, full-page ad that ran in the business section on July 17 – that it “invented the essential technologies that make your smartphone so indispensable.”

“”You know how you’re in love with your smartphone?,” ran the headline in big block letters. “That’s just the beginning.”

Fighting Back

The ad is a brilliant counter offensive move – one that has been much needed among patent licensors. It reminds diverse audiences, including the public, lawmakers and the courts, as well as its and other shareholders, that Qualcomm technology is ubiquitous.

Its inventions may currently appear most dramatically in smartphones but will soon be almost everywhere through IoT, as Qualcomm “leads the world to 5G [technology]”.

Qualcomm’s $23.5 billion in 2016 revenue was driven primarily by patent licensing.

This exercise in self-promotion, sadly, is necessary to remind audiences that inventions matter, and that Apple, Samsung, et al. simply do not have all of the innovation they need to sell products.

If licensees are not going to pay fairly for inventions that make their products special, licensors, like Qualcomm, will remind audiences about the technology that does.

Qualcomm can use the positive visibility. In January, the Federal Trade Commission filed a lawsuit against Qualcomm, accusing the company of using anticompetitive tactics to maintain its monopoly on a key semiconductor used in mobile phones.

“We put the ‘smart’ in smartphones.”

Days later, Apple, Qualcomm’s longtime partner, sued the company over what it said was $1 billion in withheld rebates. In the lawsuit, filed in Federal District Court for the Southern District of California, in San Diego (where Qualcomm’s HQ is located), Apple said the money had been promised in conjunction with an agreement not to buy chips from other suppliers or to divulge Qualcomm’s intellectual property licensing practices.

Invention Credit

The Times ad concludes with the url: qualcomm.com/weinvent. It leads to a thoughtful one-minute video that essentially says: “We’re not the name you think of when you think of smart phones, but we put the ‘smart’ in them.”

The Qualcomm ad reminds the world that Apple and other handset makers would not be what they are without Qualcomm inventions – which is true enough.

“Qualcomm – Why you love your smart phone.”

Go here to see a web version of the print ad.

Image source: qualcomm.com; nytimes.com

 


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